Treatment of iron deficiency anaemia

Application
Increasing dietary intake alone is inadequate to treat iron deficiency anaemia
Notes
May be valuable for secondary prevention of iron deficiency
Application

Adults: Usual recommended dose is 100–200 mg of elemental iron daily in 2 to 3 divided doses

Children: 3–6 mg/kg/day of elemental iron

Notes

Oral iron is the first line treatment for most patients
Should be continued for 3 months after normalisation of Hb
Hb levels should rise by approximately 20 g/L every 3 weeks following therapeutic doses of oral iron

Application
Indicated where oral preparations are ineffective or cannot be used
Notes
Iron polymaltose, iron sucrose and ferric carboxymaltose are the formulations currently available in Australia
Application
Although effective, generally discouraged 
Notes
Painful, associated with permanent skin discolouration
Application
Red blood cell transfusions are only administered to patients with severe anaemia compromising end-organ function (eg, angina or cardiac failure) or where IDA is complicated by serious, acute ongoing bleeding
Notes
Iron therapy should follow to replenish iron stores
 
References 
  1. Gastroenterological Society of AustraliaClinical update: Iron deficiency, First Edition. SydneyAustralia, Digestive Health Foundation, 2008. Available from: http://www.gesa.org.au.
  2. Pasricha SR, Flecknoe-Brown SC, Allen KJ, Gibson PR, McMahon LP, Olynyk JK, et al. Diagnosis and management of iron deficiency anaemia: a clinical update. MJA 2010;193:525–532. Available from: http://www.mja.com.au.
  3. National Blood Authority. Patient Blood Management Guidelines: Modules 2-6. Australian Red Cross Blood Service

 

<< Previous page: Management of iron deficiency anaemia  |  Next page: Oral preparations for IDA treatment >>